Category Archives: Special Events

Ven. Robina in Los Angeles | July 27-30 | Organized by Lauren Ross

VEN. ROBINA’S JULY TEACHINGS IN LOS ANGELES
ORGANIZED BY LAUREN ROSS

https://www.stayingsaneinacrazyworld.com

* Please note these teachings are not being organized by Gonpo Ludup Study Group, but by our friend Lauren Ross in LA, who is hoping to start an LA-based FPMT study group. We are helping Lauren promote the teachings and creating the Facebook event page to help get the word out. Please contact Lauren directly for any questions about the LA events: laurenross@mac.com

SCHEDULE

THURSDAY, JULY 27
7:00pm: Doors
7:30pm: Screening of Chasing Buddha documentary
9:00pm: Optional group discussion

FRIDAY, JULY 28
6:00pm: Doors
6:30pm: Teachings/Q&A with Ven. Robina
9:00pm: Optional group discussion

SATURDAY, JULY 29
9am: Optional guided meditation
10am: Teachings/Q&A with Ven. Robina
1pm: Lunch/Discussion
2pm: Teachings/Q&A with Ven. Robina
5pm: Optional group discussion

SUNDAY, JULY 30
9am: Optional guided meditation
10am: Teachings/Q&A with Ven. Robina
1pm: Lunch/Discussion
2pm: Teachings/Q&A with Ven. Robina
5pm: Optional group discussion

Schedule subject to change
Vegetarian lunch provided Saturday and Sunday
Coffee/Tea provided all dates

REGISTRATION
https://www.stayingsaneinacrazyworld.com/register
There are various registration options available based on dates of attendance and what pricing structure works best for each attendee.
* No one will be turned away for lack of funds.

LOCATION
All events held at The York Manor (4908 York Blvd, LA, CA 90042) located at York Blvd & Ave 49, on the border of Highland Park and Eagle Rock, next to Occidental College.

QUESTIONS?
Contact Lauren Ross
laurenross@mac.com

You Can Turn Anything into Dharma Practice

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You Can Turn Anything into Dharma Practice

An Interview with FPMT nun Ven. Gyalten
Palmo by Gonpo Ludup’s Vanessa Nguyen


Vanessa:
First of all, how should we call you?

Ven Palmo: Palmo is good.

Vanessa: When were you first exposed to the Buddhism?

Ven. Palmo: At the end of 1999.

Vanessa: Can you describe that first experience?

Ven. Palmo: It started with my friend who was helping her dying mother. She introduced me to a book called Tibetan Book of Living and Dying by Sogyal Rinpche, which gave Buddhist techniques that would be beneficial for me to help my parents when they were dying. I used to read it when I was riding the bicycle at the gym or sitting at home.

“Your life is a Dharma practice. Whether it’s kids, aging parents, a traffic jam, or a difficult political situation, you can turn anything into a Dharma practice.”

Then my friend bought a flyer home that advertised a teaching by Ven. Robina called “Be Your Own Therapist.” My friend and I trucked out there and listened. There was nothing that came out of Ven. Robina’s mouth that I didn’t agree with. It connected me with some of the ideas I had in the 70s that I set aside during the 80s and 90s. It felt right.

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Ven. Palmo, Ven. Chokyi, Ven. Katy with Ven. Robina (center) on pilgrimage in Myanmar in 2013. Photo: Dalgish Chew.

Vanessa: Was there one thing the stood out from Ven. Robina’s teaching?

Ven. Palmo: Not one because she talked about the mind, karma, rebirth. I already believed in rebirth and karma. Everything made sense about watching your mind, being in more control of your mind. It bridged the time when I was more spiritual and bought me back on track. In the 70s I wanted to be enlightened, but I didn’t know exactly what that meant. Buddhism actually clarified ideas from before and corrected me where my mind was steering off in the wrong direction. In the 70s I was opening my heart and becoming kinder and more loving, much of what I heard was a way back to that.

Vanessa: How can Buddhism benefit people regardless of their religious or spiritual background?

Ven. Palmo: It gives people tools to work with during difficult situations and that helps them to be more skillful in ways that would be of benefit to themselves and others. One of these tools is meditation. With meditation, we can recognize mistakes in our thinking and make adjustments to obtain more peacefulness and clarity. In cases of difficulty, we can use calmness to resolve problems more effectively.

 

“There are different kinds of meditation that can be done, even when sitting on the bus or in your car.”

 

Vanessa: Can you meditate without studying Buddhism?

Ven. Palmo: Sure. Meditation is not Buddhist at all. It’s one of the tools Buddhists and some Christians and others use. There are different kinds of meditation that can be done, even when sitting on the bus or in your car.

San Francisco traffic. Photo: Shutterstock.
San Francisco traffic. Photo: Shutterstock.

Vanessa: How can we meditate while stuck in traffic?

Ven. Palmo: I used to meditate on developing equanimity  while driving to and from work. The first step is recognize that everybody wants to be happy, and does not want to suffer. Every time I stopped at a light I would observe the people around me and think they’re just like me, just wanting to be happy.  Whatever they were doing, whether I agreed with it or not, was to try to be happy.

Vanessa: What if that person cuts us off and gives us the finger?

Ven. Palmo: Well, then we can try practicing patience. You need to become aware of your mind. Let’s say that person cuts you off, or they’re upset with you because you’re going too slow and gives you the finger. You have this whole dialogue in your mind. You can ask, “Why is this making me upset?” Look inside to see what’s happening. When someone cuts me off in traffic, I ask myself, “Why am I getting upset?” And what I see is that I’m taking it personally, thinking this is my space or my lane.  I can get annoyed because they are driving recklessly or somehow they are getting in MY way . It’s the unsatisfied mind you can see when you have the expectation that there should be no obstruction on the road and everyone should behave nicely the way you expect.  The truth is you getting angry only harms you by making you miserable and doesn’t do anything to the other person.

Lama Zopa Rinpoche, 2006
FPMT Spiritual Director Lama Zopa Rinpoche in Portland, OR in 2006. Photo John Berthold.

Vanessa: Speaking of expectations, many people developed fear and anxiety after their expectations weren’t met after the election results. How can Buddhism help us ease those unwholesome states of mind?

Ven. Palmo: That’s a really tough question. There are different levels of anxiety depending on the individual. There can be more anxiety if you’re an undocumented immigrant, Muslim or supporting a woman’s right to choose. But I think there are tools that can help each individual. People need to come to a place where they that can hear Buddhist teachings and consider certain practices. Part of it is looking inward and recognizing the results of our actions. For example someone asked Lama Zopa Rinpoche, “What do you think of Donald Trump?” Rinpoche said, “He is your karmic appearance.” We have to look at that and ask what does that mean and how can we can remedy it.

“Every time I stopped at a light I would observe the people around me and think they’re just like me, just wanting to be happy.  Whatever they were doing, whether I agreed with it or not, was to try to be happy.”

Vanessa: What kind of remedy can we use to ease the post election anxiety?

Ven. Palmo: I like to watch the news because I like to watch my mind watch the news. The key is to start meditation with concentration, like breathing, because it helps to calm the mind. You learn to watch what aggravates you and use techniques to stop it if you want. We embellish what is happening with stories, our own stories, and latch on to them. All of a sudden we have exaggerated things until we’re irritated or fearful, which causes us to suffer. Lama Zopa said, “It’s your mind and it’s your choice to be happy or miserable.”  Having a happy, calm mind doesn’t mean being complacent or not working to help others.  Getting upset and angry ourselves doesn’t help anyone.

Vanessa: If someone has little or no experience with meditation what advice would you give him or her?

Ven. Palmo: Start with breathing meditation and make the time to sit down every day, even if it’s short.  When you try to focus on the breath at first you may think your mind is getting worse.  You will see how crazy the mind is. When we jump into anger about something, we don’t see the thought process that brings up those negative emotions. By doing mediation we can get things settled enough in order to deconstruct the destructive patterns, and use antidotes we have learned to settle the mind. When you start meditation let go of any expectations, and don’t worry about the results.  Too much worrying in advance is useless. The worry doesn’t help.

 

“The truth is when people start to meditate, it always looks worse than expected. The first step of meditation happens when you notice how wacked out, crazy your mind is. Noticing it is a cause of celebration!”

 

Vanessa: What advice do you have for someone who has difficulty meditating in one posture or has a racing mind?

Ven. Palmo: Practice slowing the mind with short meditations until you become accustomed to longer sessions. If there are body issues and you can’t sit cross-legged, sit in a chair. There’s also walking meditation.

Vanessa: Is it possible to travel the path to enlightenment without meditating?

Ven. Palmo: You can start on the path to enlightenment without meditation, but if you expect to finish it meditation is a must. Meditation actually helps to gain realizations. You can gain some insights while you’re moving, but realizations come from time on the cushion. It depends what you do with your mind, but you do need to learn how to gain control of your mind. That’s where meditation can help. The truth is when people start to meditate, it always looks worse than expected. The first step of meditation happens when you notice how wacked out, crazy your mind is. Noticing it is a cause of celebration!

Vanessa: So people should rejoice when they see that their mind is going crazy during meditation?

Ven. Palmo: Yeah! Because you’re finally seeing what you’ve been doing all the time. By seeing it you then can begin to change it.

Vanessa: Orange County is known for conspicuous consumption such as nice cars, houses, etc. Do those conditions pose a challenge to one’s Buddhism practice?

Ven. Palmo: No. I have a nice house in San Francisco and I drive an old Mercedes to get to far places. But if you’re life is consumed with your possessions then it could become a problem. The more resources one has, the more they can help benefit others.

Photo: The statue of Shakyamuni Buddha at the Mahabodhi Temple in Bodhgaya, in Northern India, where the Buddha is said to have attained enlightenment, while meditating under the Bodhi Tree. Jamyang190.

Vanessa: The Buddha left his wife and child in the middle of the night. Some people would see that as abandonment. How would you explain the Buddha’s actions?

Ven. Palmo: Today it would look like abandonment. But what I think is that he saw the suffering of the people in his kingdom. He wanted to end suffering, including the suffering of his wife and son. Everyone was going to experience the sufferings of getting old, getting sick, and end up dying, no matter how good their conditions were. If you look at the bigger view, he did it to find a way to end suffering for his wife and child and all other sentient beings.

 

“The thing to remember is that the changes we experience in Dharma practice comes slowly. The best thing to do is go slowly. I would say relax; don’t worry. If you are consistent change will come.”

 

Vanessa: How can one who works full time to support a family commit to a Dharma practice?

Ven. Palmo: It is more difficult. Each person needs to figure out how to use his or her time. The truth is having a family is a huge Dharma practice. Your life is a Dharma practice. Whether it’s kids, aging parents, a traffic jam, or a difficult political situation, you can turn anything into a Dharma practice.

Vanessa: What advice would you give to some who gets overly excited about Buddhism and immediately jumps into intense meditations and retreats?

Ven. Palmo: I would tell people to be careful. Usually when somebody gets too excited and jumps totally into retreats and does this and that, it’s simply because they want a quick result. And often in the West, we think results should happen in a flash, like turning on a computer and Googling something. We expect all kinds of amazing things to happen because we’re reading about amazing experiences others have had. This can lead to disappointment. The thing to remember is that the changes we experience in Dharma practice comes slowly. The best thing to do is go slowly. I would say relax; don’t worry. If you are consistent change will come.

GEN DON HANDRICK VISIT | OCT 23–30, 2017

Gen. Don Handrick Teacher in Residence
Oct 23–30, 2017

REGISTRATION, COST, & DETAILS FOR EACH EVENT TO COME

Gonpo Ludup is delighted to welcome Gen. Don back to Laguna Beach!

Tue Oct  24
Conscious Aging: Enjoying the Gift of Growing Older | PART 1 
7–9 p.m.
Cost: TBD
Venue: OM Laguna Beach, 332 Forest Ave.

Wed Oct 25
Meditation for Busy People 
7–8:30 p.m.
Cost: TBD
Venue: OM Laguna Beach, 332 Forest Ave.

Thu Oct 26
Conscious Aging: Enjoying the Gift of Growing Older | PART 2 
7–9 p.m.
Cost: TBD
Venue: OM Laguna Beach, 332 Forest Ave.

Fri Oct 27
Making Friends with Ourselves 
7–9 p.m.
Cost: TBD
Venue: OM Laguna Beach, 332 Forest Ave.

Sat Oct 28
Weekend Workshop: The Joy of Letting Go: Breaking Free of Harmful Habits | PART 1
10 a.m.–4 p.m.
Cost: TBD
Venue: OM Laguna Beach, 332 Forest Ave

Sun Oct 29
Weekend Workshop: The Joy of Letting Go: Breaking Free of Harmful Habits | PART 2
10 a.m.–4 p.m.
Cost: TBD
Venue: OM Laguna Beach, 332 Forest Ave

ABOUT GEN DON
Don Handrick is a graduate of the first Masters Program of Buddhist Studies, the FPMT’s seven-year study program inspired by the traditional geshe studies at the great Gelugpa monastic universities. Since 2006, Don has been the resident teacher at Thubten Norbu Ling Buddhist Center in Santa Fe, NM, and he also teaches regularly at the Ksitigarbha Tibetan Buddhist Center in Taos, NM. Don also serves as a Buddhist teacher for Liberation Prison Project, which includes teaching Buddhism at a local prison in New Mexico. In 2015, Don led the month-long November Course at Kopan Monastery and in 2016, he began spending a portion of each year visiting other FPMT centers as a touring teacher.

QUESTIONS?
Contact Kate
gonpo.ludup@gmail.com
(949) 371-6804

Articles about Gen Don
Dharma teachers: seven years in the making

Some of Gen Don’s Teachings
Using Work as a Spiritual Path
What’s so Bad about Complaining?

Online Live Meditation Classes with Ven. Palmo | Aug 16

ONLINE LIVE MEDITATION CLASSES

EVERY OTHER WEDNESDAY EVENING

NEXT CLASS: WED, AUG 16,  7–8 pm

OUR LAST CLASS BEFORE OUR SUMMER BREAK! (AUG 17–24)

Lead by FPMT nun Ven. Gyalten Palmo


Gonpo Ludup Study Group
is delighted to host an on-going every other Wednesday-evening online meditation series with FPMT nun Ven. Gyalten Palmo. Open to all. No experience with meditation necessary.

LINK TO JOIN:
https://zoom.us/j/761240171
* PLEASE NOTE that the class closes at 7:05pm, so please join in time. We’d love to have you!

ABOUT THIS ONLINE CLASS
We are using Zoom video software for these classes. Once you click on the August 16 drop-in meditation link (https://zoom.us/j/761240171), you will receive a prompt to download Zoom on your computer. It takes about two minutes, depending on your Internet speed.

ABOUT VEN. PALMO
Ven. Gyalten Palmo grew up in San Francisco and started studying Tibetan Buddhism 16 years ago. She has studied closely under Ribur Rinpoche, His Eminence Choden Rinpoche, Geshe Ngawang Dakpa and Lama Zopa Rinpoche, and completed FPMT’s five-year Basic Program. In 2012, she was ordained by Choden Rinpoche at Sera Jey Monastic University in India. As an FPMT-registered teacher, she has been teaching Discovering Buddhism regularly since 2013 at Tse Chen Ling Center, our San Francisco center. Ven. Palmo loves studying and sharing the Dharma with others.

COST
No cost. Offered by Gonpo Ludup Study Group.

DATE & TIME
Wednesday, August 16, 7–8 pm

QUESTIONS?
Contact Gonpo Ludup’s Tina, who is kindly facilitating this class
tinakbarber@gmail.com

MONTHLY MEDICINE BUDDHA PUJAS | MAR 12, 2017

The Medicine, or Healing, Buddha is the manifestation of the healing energy of all enlightened beings. Medicine Buddha practice is said to be particularly beneficial both for mental and physical healing as well as for world peace, and also for success. These pujas are especially beneficial for those who are experiencing physical or mental illness or those who have recently passed away. We also always dedicate to the long lives of our teachers, and for the well-being of our local & global communities, friends, family and loved ones.

If you are unable to attend, you are welcome to email the names of your friends and loved ones who are sick, struggling, experiencing any type of obstacle, or those who have recently passed away, to gonpo.ludup@gmail.com. We will include them all in our prayers.

“The seven Medicine Buddhas manifested in order to pacify the obstacles to the achievement of temporary happiness, liberation and the ultimate happiness of full enlightenment,” says the great Tibetan Buddhist Yogi Lama Zopa Rinpoche. “They are powerful in healing diseases as well as for purification. The Medicine Buddha practice can be used to help purify those who have already died and liberate them from suffering. It is also very powerful in bringing about success, both temporary and ultimate.”

DATES & TIME
Sunday, March 12, 7–8:30 pm

LOCATION
Kate’s apartment (RSVP to Kate for address & directions: gonpo.ludup@gmail.com)

QUESTIONS?
Contact Kate
gonpo.ludup@gmail.com

Discovering Buddhism Module 5: Death and Rebirth | JUN 4-JUL 23

DISCOVERING BUDDHISM
MODULE FIVE
DEATH AND REBIRTH
JUN 4-JUL 23
With FPMT Teacher Ven. Gyalten Palmo

THIS COURSE IS ONE OF OUR “LOCALS-ONLY” LIVE ONLINE COURSES. WE WILL MEET FOR 6 SUNDAYS AT OM LAGUNA BEACH. VEN. PALMO WILL BE TEACHING ONLINE LIVE FROM SAN FRANCISCO. 

REGISTRATION FOR DB 5 IS CLOSED

Gonpo Ludup Study Group is delighted to host our fifth module of FPMT‘s Discovering Buddhism series, Death & Rebirth, with FPMT teacher Ven. Gyalten Palmo.

Although this course is part of the Discovering Buddhism series, anyone is welcome to attend — you do not have to have attended the previous modules. Each class will consist of teachings, meditations and Q & A with Ven. Palmo. There will also be optional homework and readings each week.
ABOUT MODULE 5
Explore the process of death and rebirth and its impact on how we live our lives. By reflecting on death you can learn to fulfill your purpose in life, resolve conflicts, and develop the skills to help yourself and others at death.
ABOUT VEN. GYALTEN PALMO
 

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Ven. Gyalten Palmo grew up in San Francisco and started studying Tibetan Buddhism 16 years ago. She has studied closely under Ribur Rinpoche, His Eminence Choden Rinpoche, Geshe Ngawang Dakpa and Lama Zopa Rinpoche, and completed FPMT’s five-year Basic Program. In 2012, she was ordained by Choden Rinpoche at Sera Jey Monastic University in India. As an FPMT-registered teacher, she has been teaching Discovering Buddhism regularly since 2013 at Tse Chen Ling, our San Francisco center, since 2013. Ven. Palmo loves studying and sharing the Dharma with others.

COST
$108 suggested donation for the course.
No one turned away for lack of funds. Contact Kate at gonpo.ludup@gmail.com for scholarship details.

DATES & TIMES

Class 1 | Sunday, June 4, 10–11:30 am
Class 2 | Sunday, June 11, 10–11:30 am
Class 3 | Sunday, June 25, 10–11:30 am
Class 4 | Sunday, July 9, 10–11:30 am
Class 5 | Sunday, July 16, 10–11:30 am
Class 6 | Sunday, July 23, 10–11:30 am

LOCATION
OM laguna beach
332 Forest Avenue #28
Laguna Beach CA 92651

QUESTIONS?
Contact Kate
gonpo.ludup@gmail.com
(949) 371–6804

Ven. Robina Courtin Visit | Aug 1-13, 2017

Ven. Robina Courtin Visit
Aug 1-13, 2017

Gonpo Ludup Study Group is delighted to welcome Ven. Robina back to Laguna Beach!

Scroll down below for details & tickets for each event:
Tue, Aug 1 Public Talk: Cultivating Love & Compassion in Difficult Times
Wed, Aug 2 Public Talk: What Is Happiness & How to Find It
Sun, Aug 6 All Day Workshop: All About Karma

Tue, Aug 8 Public Talk: Dealing with Depression & Anxiety
Fri, Aug 11 Public Talk: Happy Living, Happy Dying
Sat-Sun, Aug 12–13 Weekend Workshop: Preparing for Death & How to Help Others

Tue, Aug 1

Public Talk: Cultivating Love & Compassion in Difficult Times
7-9 pm
Cost: $20
Venue: Laguna Beach Neighborhood Congregational Church, 340 St Ann’s Dr.
According to Buddhist psychology, “love” is the wish for others to be happy; and “compassion” is the wish that they not suffer. Easy enough to understand intellectually, but how to put these powerful concepts into practice? What would practicing love and compassion in the face of adversity look like? How do we learn to love and have compassion for those that harm us? How to practice in the face of fear or pain or suffering or sickness? Buddhist psychology teaches that the development of love and compassion is the point of the path to enlightenment, and the end result is the removal of all separateness from others and the spontaneous capacity to benefit all sentient beings perfectly. The development of love and compassion is dependent upon renunciation of suffering and its causes, as well as the wisdom that sees reality as it actually exists. This is possible for all of us. Buddhist and non-Buddhist alike can benefit from these teachings, applying the great cognitive psychological practices of Buddhist wisdom to our lives, learning to love our problems, our enemies, and to live happier, more fulfilled lives.

 


Wed, Aug 2

Public Talk: What Is Happiness & How to Find It
7-9 pm
Cost: $20
Venue: Laguna Beach Neighborhood Congregational Church, 340 St Ann’s Dr.
We spend our lives being seduced by the outside world, believing utterly that happiness and suffering come from “out there.” But Buddhist psychology says that what goes in our minds is the main source of our happiness, and how we deal with life. The experiential implication of this view is empowerment, accountability, and the courage to change. And the ability to change the way we experience the world, our suffering, the ups and downs of life. Gradually we loosen the grip of ego-grasping and the other neuroses, thus developing our marvelous potential for happiness, clarity, self-confidence, empathy and the other qualities that Buddha says are at the core of our being.



Sun, Aug 6
VRC 6 by Marc Sakamoto

Cost: $80 (includes your book of teachings; Felicia’s delicious teas & cookies and Kathy’s famous chocolate cake; Lunch catered by Felicia, a Four Season’s chef; as well as our running costs, etc. etc. both days)
Venue: Laguna Beach Neighborhood Congregational Church, 340 St Ann’s Dr.

SCHEDULE
9:30 am Doors
10 – 11:30 am First Session
11:30 am – 12 pm Tea Break
12 – 1 pm Second Session
1 – 2:30 pm Lunch & Discussion Groups
2:30 – 3:30 pm Third session
3:30 – 4 pm Tea & Cake
4-5 pm Final Session

We spend our lives being seduced by the outside world, believing utterly that happiness and suffering come from “out there”. Even more fundamental than that, we assume that we are the handiwork of someone else. The experiential implications of this are blame, anger, and guilt, bringing ever-deepening levels of suffering and hopelessness.

Buddha’s view of reality is that we create ourselves: we come into this life at the first moment of conception in our mother’s womb fully programmed with our own tendencies and the seeds of our experiences in this life. As the Dalai Lama says, the view of karma is one of “self-creation.” We are, literally, the creators of our lives, our happiness, and our suffering. We are the boss.

With this view we realize that everything we experience is our own “karmic appearance”, as Lama Zopa Rinpoche puts it. Everything is made by our own minds, in the past and in the present.

The experiential implication of this view is empowerment, accountability, and the courage to change and, combining it with an understanding of the Buddha’s model of the mind, we gradually loosen the grip of ego-grasping and the other neuroses, thus developing our marvelous potential for clarity, self-confidence, empathy and the other qualities that Buddha says are at the core of our being.

 


Tue, Aug 8
18057074_1783867101927400_7881417551787651300_n
Public Talk: Dealing with Depression & Anxiety
7-9 pm
Cost: $20
Venue: Laguna Beach Neighborhood Congregational Church, 340 St Ann’s Dr.
Depression and anxiety are conditions almost all of us in the West can relate to and have experienced at one time or another. The Buddhist view is that we’ve all got extraordinary potential to reduce the unhappy emotions that so often overwhelm our lives, and to cultivate our consciousness and extraordinary potential for happiness and joy. It’s not some special gift that only some people have; according to Buddhist psychology this potential is innate within all of us.

Potential to lessen depression, anxiety, fear, neediness, low self-esteem and to grow love, contentment, compassion, clarity, courage and the other qualities we want so badly.

It is something very earthy, so tasty, not something vague and mystical.

We need to learn how to access our own minds, and as Lama Yeshe said, to become our own therapists. Sounds simple enough, but it’s not a job we’re educated to do. It is not our habit to look inside, much less know deeply and well what’s going on there.

 


Fri, Aug 11
VRC 3 photo by George Manos copy
Public Talk: Happy Living, Happy Dying
7:30-9:30 pm
Cost: $20
Venue: Laguna Beach Women’s Club, 286 St Ann’s Dr.

This public talk will be an introduction to the Tibetan Buddhist approach to death (and life), in preparation for our Weekend Workshop: Preparing for Death & How to Help Others, Aug 12-13, based on Lama Zopa Rinpoche’s most recent book, edited by Ven. Robina, on how to help our loved ones and ourselves at the time of death.

 


Sat, Aug 12 – Sun Aug 13
2010-or-2011_VRC-tushita copy
Weekend Workshop: Preparing for Death & How to Help Others
10 am-5 pm Saturday
10 am-5 pm Sunday
Cost: $80 for one day/$160 for the weekend (includes your book of teachings; Felicia’s delicious teas & cookies and Kathy’s famous chocolate cake; Lunch catered by Felicia, a Four Season’s chef; as well as our running costs, etc. etc. both days)

Venue: Laguna Beach Neighborhood Congregational Church, 340 St Ann’s Dr.

SCHEDULE
9:30 am Doors
10 – 11:30 am First Session
11:30 am – 12 pm Tea Break
12 – 1 pm Second Session
1 – 2:30 pm Lunch & Discussion Groups
2:30 – 3:30 pm Third session
3:30 – 4 pm Tea & Cake
4-5 pm Final Session

As Lama Zopa Rinpoche says in his latest book about how to help others through the dying and death process, “Helping our loved ones at the time of death is the best service we can offer them, our greatest gift. Why? Because death is the most important time of life: it’s at death that the next rebirth is determined.”

But we before we’re qualified to do that, we need to know how to be ready for our own death, our own rebirth. During this two-day workshop we will go through the crucial Tibetan Buddhist teachings and meditation practices that prepare us for this natural event so that we can accept it and face it without fear, but with confidence and contentment that our life has been lived in the most fruitful way, thus perfectly preparing us for our next life.

The teaching will be based upon the 2015 publication of How to Help Your Loved Ones Enjoy Death and Go Happily to Their Next Rebirth: A Handbook by Lama Zopa Rinpoche, edited by Ven. Robina Courtin.

These teachings are invaluable for all of us — people of all faiths, atheists, etc. — and also for professionals in care giving, hospice, and chaplaincy.

 

 


NO ONE IS EVER TURNED AWAY FROM ANY OF OUR TEACHING EVENTS FOR LACK OF FUNDS. CONTACT KATE FOR SCHOLARSHIP DETAILS FOR ANY OF THE EVENTS YOU WISH TO ATTEND: gonpo.ludup@gmail.com


ABOUT VEN. ROBINA
Australian ex-Catholic, ex-political activist, ex-radical feminist, and former body guard for the Dalai Lama, Robina Courtin has been a Buddhist nun since 1978. Well known for her work for 14 years with people in prisons in the US and Australia, Robina’s life and work is the subject of the award-winning documentary Chasing Buddha, featured at Sundance in 2001. A renowned teacher of Buddhist psychology and philosophy, she teaches full time around the world at the centers of her teachers’ organization, the Foundation for the Preservation of the Mahayana Tradition (FPMT).


QUESTIONS?
Contact Kate
gonpo.ludup@gmail.com
(949) 371–6804